Monday, April 19, 2021

Celebrating the Primrose


Today, April 19, is Primrose Day. It is said that the primrose was the favorite flower of Benjamin Disraeli, twice prime minister of England -- Disraeli died on this day in 1881 and Primrose Day was born. I have several of these lovely plants in my English cottage garden. They are just beginning to bloom. 
 
The name, primrose, comes from the Latin 'primus' that means 'the first.'  Appropriate for one of the first flowers to bloom in spring. There are at least 500 species of Primula plus numerous hybrids and cultivars. They are native to the temperate regions of the Northern and Southern hemisphere. Every year, in early spring, Duane gifts me a Primula x polyanthus -- the variety that is forced and sold as potted plants. I keep it on my desk until the flowers fade, then I plant it under the garden-room window to enjoy for years to come.

Primula x polyanthus, a spring gift from my husband.

Primroses are easy to grow; they are generally pest free and need little care. They like partial shade such as under a tree or large shrub. I have some under the smoke bush.

Primroses and forget-me-nots in the Cottage Garden. There is a smoke bush near by.

Plant them in moist, slightly acidic soil. Give them plenty of organic matter and they will thrive. They are considered to be short-lived perennials, but I have some that are 10-years old or more.

One of my first primroses 15-years ago is, however, no longer with us.

Primula are hardy to zones 5-7. In warmer or colder zones they are used as bedding plants. They are not grown as perennials in warmer climates because they need a winter chill.

It is important to me to have primroses in my garden as a fond remembrance of my childhood in England. I particularly loved the yellow Primula veris, the cowslip, that my mother grew.

I photographed these lovely blooms in England on a visit to my mother.
Primrose Primula sieboldii 'Koharu Biyori' in Jenny Rose Carey's garden, Amber PA

 More of my favorite primroses:

Note that they are planted at the edge of the border. Primroses like rocks, moisture, and good drainage.
 
 Primroses come in so many lovely colors:



Do you grow primroses? Wishing you a very happy Primrose Day!

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This month, I  missed Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day, hosted by the lovely Carol at May dreams Gardens, because we are starting to get really busy with the spring cleanup.  On that day, the 15th, the flowers in my garden were the same as those last year, therefore, you can see how my garden looked by clicking HERE. One difference is the mass of miniature daffodils that I planted in the Serenity Garden. I love the way they reflect the golden yellow of the forsythia that blooms behind the fence.

One of the groups of miniature daffodils in the Serenity Garden

My two new miniature daffodils:

Narcissus 'Tete-a-Tete'

I don't remember the name of this double, miniature Narcissus
 

Another change from last year is the weeping cherry that has become much fuller. It was lovely then; it is stunning now!

Snow fountain cherry Prunus x 'Snofozam'

 And finally, a sweet Easter gift from my daughter ...



Stay safe and well,  dear friends.

Love,

Pamela x

 


I love reading your comments. I hope you leave one so I’ll know you visited! 

I look forward to visiting your blog in return.

9 comments:

  1. Such gorgeous primroses and indeed all of your blooms. Every day seems to be Bloom Day in your garden.

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  2. The native primrose is one of my favourite plants, and like you, I love cowslips too. Our daffodils are going over, it's the turn of the tulips to shine now.

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  3. Hi Pam. It is always a pleasure visiting your garden, and those Primroses and forget-me-nots are beautiful! The weeping Snow Fountain Cherry is gorgeous too and I can see how it has grown. Happy spring and Bloom Day!

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  4. Oh yes, the primroses are beautiful! I haven't planted any in the ground, but I've grown them in pots at times. Your other blooms are lovely, too.

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  5. Pamela,
    what a weeping cherry! it's amazing!
    Lovely daffodils,
    hugs.
    Nadezda
    https://northern-garden.blogspot.com/

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  6. A wonderful post and I learnt so much about primroses reading it. I had never heard about Primrose Day before. The children bought me a primrose for 50p when they were small and it has expanded and grown over the years. I have now given the children cuttings for their garden. They grow in all the hedgerows around here and occasionally you will come across a male pink variety. Thank you for such an interesting post. Sarah x

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  7. I always learn something new on your site. "Primrose Day" - what a good idea. I don't have a single one and didn't realize you could plant those from the little pots that are sold in the store. I will be on the lookout for them now.
    Jeannie@GetMeToTheCountry

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  8. Your primroses are gorgeous.

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  9. Hi Pam; Your Primroses are beautiful, I love the colors. The weeping cherry also is quite a sight. My garden is looking better with every warm day. I have started numerous seeds and dahlia tubers growing that were wintered over. I should be in your area next week..I'll call to see if you are around. Chris

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