Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Word4Wednesday: Tracery


Donna of Garden Walk Garden Talk beautifully describes 'Tracery in the Landscape' in her Word4Wednesday meme today.  She illustrates the word with stunning photographs which I can not begin to emulate. Here is my simple response to Donna's challenge, just one of the plants in my garden: Physalis alkekengi Chinese lantern.


My first Chinese lantern was given to me by my Master Gardener friend, Karen. It is a herbaceous perennial plant that I grow for my grandchildren. They love the bright orange papery coverings over its fall fruit that truly resemble real Chinese lanterns.




 Recently I was clearing the flower beds--early because of the mild weather--and found this lantern with its beautiful tracery. The papery husk has skeletonized, and its orange fruit is still visible. I guess it survived because of the winter that wasn't, and because it was protected from birds by dried grasses.



What plants in your garden illustrate tracery in the landscape?  Do visit Donna's blog for lots of ideas. You will love her photographs!

I hope you are enjoying spring in your garden!
Pamela x


~~ I love reading your comments. I hope you leave one so I’ll know you visited!
I look forward to visiting your blog in return.

14 comments:

Jane said...

This is such an unusual plant, don't really see it about nowadays but it def' deserves a revival as it's quite special x

Jo said...

I love Chinese lanterns. I had one in my garden but I lost it a couple of years ago. I don't know how difficult they are to grow from seed but I'm going to give it a go.

The Redneck Rosarian said...

Love the Chinese lanterns. Very interesting concept. It has me thinking about my own garden...

Donna@Gardens Eye View said...

Pam that is a stunning photo...I love the filigree effect...

Donna said...

That little Chinese Lantern really is a work of art. It looks more like a lantern in this form and is a lovely example of tracery, Pam. Thank for joining with it, and thank you for your very kind words.

Karin / Southern Meadows said...

Wonderful example! I do love Chinese Lanterns. I typically use them in dried flower arrangements but have never grown it before. I may just give it a try.

Lona said...

Great example Pam. I have never grown them but love the looks of them for fall decoration.

Teresa O said...

Oh how I loved my Chinese lantern plants. The self-sowed and I had a whole corner of orange lanterns to pick and dry for fall decorating. Nature's tracery is so fragile and lovely. Something to keep my eyes open for.

HolleyGarden said...

Absolutely gorgeous! That skeletal husk looks so delicate. I'm amazed that it made it through the winter! With the seed inside, it looks like a cage. Great illustration of tracery.

Marguerite said...

This is a wonderful photograph. Such luck to find this still in the garden. I love the little papery lanterns on this plant, they're the perfect addition to autumn bouquets.

Andrea said...

Great, that plant is really awesome. I haven't seen it in person though i have seen it in photos. The skeletonized stage is the loveliest, it might be preserved indoors also maybe.

Vesna - Kalipso said...

I have them too and I just adore when they have this lacy look.

Carolyn @ Carolyn's Shade Gardens said...

Beautiful illustration of tracery.

Bridget said...

Lovely post Pam and lovely pic of the filigree lantern. Very pretty! The only time I've seen this in skeletonised leaves, which are also so lovely.